Naturally Austin and Naturally Boulder: Branding and Messaging Your Natural Product Webinar 4-28-20

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A webinar on branding and messaging in the natural products industry, presented by Naturally Austin and Naturally Boulder on April 28, 2020, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Featured panelists:
– Rebecca Bartlett, Principal and Creative Director, Bartlett Brands
– Lauren Golik, Art Director, Bartlett Brands
– Pilar Ochi, Vice President of Marketing for AlterEco
– Alison P. Sauter, Founder and Creative Director, Shelf Studio
– Stephanie Stahl, CEO and Co-Founder, Ace of Air
– Sylvia Tawse, Founder, The Fresh Ideas Group

Moderated by Arron Mansika, Executive Director of Naturally Boulder

Naturally Austin and Naturally Boulder: Branding and Messaging Your Natural Product Webinar 4-28-20 from Naturally Boulder on Vimeo.

 

Notes from the Branding and Messaging Your Natural Product Webinar:

  • Challenge in today’s market place – so many ways to deploy stories 
    • In this pandemic – tone-deaf storytelling 
    • CPG industry needs to sell better stuff and be compassionate toward the plant 
    • We need fewer stories but better stories (Sylvia) 
  • Look at true tensions in stories, instead of running away from that, embrace that. Little Red Riding Hood wouldn’t be very interesting without the wolf.
  • There is power in connection, even during this pandemic: social isolation → social solidarity 
  • Scaling up doesn’t mean abandoning the ethos, the value that the brands offer 
  • Storytelling is really targeted toward the consumer — what’s in this for me? 
    • In food and beverages, people like to feel good about what they buy 
    • The Greenwashing Movement — consumers like clean and sustainable 
    • It’s not just sustainable products — it’s sustainable business 
      • It’s important to separate yourselves from the masses in the crowded market
      • Be value-driven 
  • How ever you design your packing to be disposed of (whatever the end of life is), you want to communicate that clearly with consumers (so they can recycle or compost properly, for instance)
  • Approval seals (how to make sense of these and describe them):
    • Sustainability seals: USDA Organic, Fair Trade, and B Corp seal
      • Corporations are businesses that meet the highest standards of verified social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability to balance profit and purpose. B Corps are accelerating a global culture shift to redefine success in business and build a more inclusive and sustainable economy (back of package). 
      • USDA Organic seal – Eating organic is eating sustainably! Organic food is a long-term solution resulting in less soil and water pollution, a decreased reliance on oil-based fertilizers and pesticides, greater biodiversity, and less greenhouse gas emissions (front of package, extremely beneficial).
      • FAIR-TRADE seal – Fair trade empowers people to make choices for the good of themselves and their community, regardless of gender, status, position in society, or position on the globe. Rigorous standards give farmers, workers, and fishermen a voice in the workplace and the community.
    • Dietary seals 
    • Great sustainable brands: 
  • Not just doing the right thing, but also letting the world know that you’re doing the right thing 
  • Communicating sustainability messages: they are generally very complex, so it’s important to be honest with yourself about how much bandwidth your consumer has 
    • Consider how to package your product with sustainable visceral cues to capture the audience
    • Build relationships with packaging manufacturers 
  • Analyze consumer spending habits to determine how to best package 
    • Ex. if you are a cleaning product, your packaging needs to be more straightforward because people usually just grab and go, but if you’re chocolate or coffee, you can get more creative